Houzzers on Houzz.com Say

Houzzers on Houzz.com Say: Dream Kitchen Must-Haves

 

by Becky Harris

Houzzers on Houzz.com Say

 

The kitchen above one among many must have for kitchens. This kitchen features a Pot filler. This handy faucet means no more having to schlep a heavy pasta pot full of water from the sink to the stove-top.

Bianco Antico: Granite

Bianco Antico: Granite used in kitchen above

The Granite counter top featured in this display is called Bianco Antico and isoffered in our Jackson Stoneworks Stoneyard, located on 1111 SW 22nd Ave, Gainesville, FL.

 

 

Hidden knife storageThe Kitchen below features a Hidden knife storage. These boxes pop up from the counter. Similar systems exist for storing other items, like herbs and even iPod devices.

Big cabinet drawers. Houzzers want to make the most of every square inch of storage space. Big drawers, especially those with dish racks and other inserts, maximize bottom cabinets’ storage potential.

Kitchen and Bath

Kitchen Remodel Costs: The Mid- to-Upper-Range Kitchen Remodel

by Bud Dietrich, Houzz.com contributor 

Kitchen and BathSeems that whenever I meet a potential new client, the first question is, “How much will this project cost?” I then try to explain that this is like asking, “How long is a piece of string?”
 

You see, there are just too many things that will influence a project’s cost. From basic construction issues, such as repairing what may need repairs, to client selections for cabinets, appliances and everything else, to whether or not we plan on moving things around or adding space, there are so many variables that come into play.

What if the existing kitchen layout doesn’t work? Maybe you want more space because you really love to bake and want a place to roll and cut out all those holiday cookies. Or a kitchen island is something you’ve always wanted so that friends and family can sit nearby as you display your culinary skills.

A $40,000 to $75,000 kitchen remodel might include:

 1. A total rework of the space. Everything, including the kitchen sink, may need to be moved, which means new plumbing, electrical, air ducts and so on. 

2. Professional-style appliances. From the 48-inch built-in stainless steel refrigerator to the 48-inch cooktop with grille and griddle to the 30-inch double convection ovens, this kitchen is all about creating wonderful meals.

3. Custom island. And if you want an island, why not make it like some large piece of furniture with legs and beadboard? It’s a perfect place for the kids to sit and do homework while the evening meal is being prepared.

 

4. Custom cabinetry. Beaded, inset doors of clear alder with a custom stain and glaze in nonstandard sizes with all the accessories make for a beautiful and functional kitchen at a cost.

5. Designer hardware. Forget about using big-box knobs and handles. Take the time to find the pieces that are special. After all, you will be using these things constantly.

6. Wood flooring. Wood or porcelain tile or a stone floor will be more costly than a vinyl tile or sheet.

 

7. Stone counters and a glass tile backsplash. A quartz or natural stone material such as granite will certainly be more costly than a laminate top. For some, the look and feel of these materials is worth the extra cost. And while laminate may start to look used and nicked up in a few years, stone will be fresh and new looking for years, even decades, after first being installed.

 

8. Custom storage. With custom cabinets, you don’t have to settle for what’s stocked. So if you want a cabinet designed to handle small appliances with drop-down doors that become extra counter space, custom is the only way to go. 

Students Glimpse Future at UF Interior Design Forum

Students of the University of Florida’s Department of Interior Design got a special behind-the-scenes look yesterday at the high-tech ways in which granite countertops are made when they visited a local granite countertop factory. Jackson Stoneworks, a national countertop supplier for Lowe’s Home Improvement stores and local Kitchen and Bath Remodeler located in SE Gainesville, hosted Dr. Nicole Campbell and about twenty of her students for a morning of tours, demonstrations, and interaction with local Design Professionals in an effort to incorporate some real-world experience into UF’s Interior Design Materials and Finishes course.

Dr. Nicole Campbell organized the event for her students because she believes that learning first-hand about the materials with which they will be designing will give them greater insight into the potential applications of the products.

“Although we discuss the different aspects of materials like granite countertops with them in the classroom, I wanted them to actually see the slabs and observe the process by which they are made so that they have a better understanding of the material.” said Campbell.

Her specific goals for the event included providing students with an understanding of practical considerations, such as which products are generally more or less expensive and what accounts for the differences in costs. During the showroom tour portion of the morning, Jackson Stoneworks President, Tyler Ryals addressed just that.

“One of the key factors in the difference in price among the granite colors is how scarce that particular stone is in comparison to other stones. For example, if a quarry mines a block of the stone but only one third of that block is actually useable for countertops in terms of quality, that material will be more expensive because less of it is readily available,” explained Ryals.

Dr. Campbell requested that Jackson Stoneworks also invite practicing Design Professionals from the area to the event in order for her students to learn how the designer works with clients in terms of information the interior designer provides to clients, and the discounts available for interior designers from suppliers like Jackson Stoneworks. Jackson Stoneworks in-house Designer, Nicole Drew was able to deliver some insight into that relationship by walking the group through the showroom as if they were a prospective client.

“My goal this morning is to show you the design consultation process by walking you through our showroom as if you were all one collective client,” said Drew, as she led the group into the Tile Showroom.

Another goal that Dr. Campbell hoped for her students to achieve during the event was to gain a better understanding of how the designer decides which materials will work best in which applications. Again, Ryals was able to enlighten the future designers about the materials they are choosing.

“When selecting materials, it is important to keep in mind the properties of the materials you are selecting and how those materials will perform. For example, we do not recommend marble for use in the kitchen because it is softer and scratches more easily than granite or quartz; but we do recommend marble in bathrooms.” stated Ryals. “We really only recommend marble in the kitchen for clients who are more often making reservations than making dinner,” Ryals added jokingly.

Sarah Cain, a prominent Interior Design Professional and graduate of the University of Florida, attended the event and provided the students with an objective outside perspective on the importance of choosing the right contractors and suppliers for their clients projects.

“It’s very important to use someone you trust to do good work for your clients. There are plenty of companies out there that will do it for cheap, but you want to make sure you know that the person you choose is going to do it right. I have a great relationship with Tyler [Ryals] and Jackson Stoneworks for example, because I have worked with them in the past and I know that they care about the work they do and will take care of my clients.” Cain stated.

The showroom portion of the event concluded with a demonstration by Project Manager Christian Benway, in which he introduced the students to the latest technology in creating templates for countertops. Benway demonstrated the new hi-tech process by shooting an actual template of the countertops on the Kitchen vignette in the showroom using their laser templating device, which uses lasers to mark various points on the countertop and create a digital drawing that can be saved and later overlaid onto the customer’s actual slab during the layout process.

The students were then guided out into the Stoneyard to walk among the actual slabs of granite for an activity in which they were asked to write down their 5 favorites from among the hundreds of slabs on display. The results of the survey were later tallied and announced during the light catered lunch, with the most popular color being identified as a stone named “Black Titanium”.

Following their tour of the Stoneyard, the students were brought inside the factory to see the digital stone manufacturing processes in action. The demonstration began with the customers slab being placed on an A-frame with a green screen background to be photographed with high resolution photography equipment.

The students then moved into the Design Center office where they observed the digital layout process being performed by Programmer Derek Morris, in which the actual digital template created earlier in the tour was overlaid onto the digital photograph of the customers slab. Using special design software Morris demonstrated how the digital template image can be manipulated on the photo of the stone in a way to create a layout that is both esthetically pleasing and minimizes waste.

“We want to line up the pieces so that the pattern of the stone flows smoothly through any required seams, and also make sure that we get the most out of each slab.” Morris explained.

Standing safely outside the stone fabrication area, the students observed as the nearly two-ton slab that was just photographed was then hoisted into the air by a vacuum-lift overhead crane system and moved across the factory to be lowered onto the table of the Fusion WaterJet CNC machine. The students then watched as the automated stone cutting machine sprang to life after the machine Operator scanned the barcode generated by the Programmer. As Ryals explained, the machine cuts the stone according to the programmed pathways using a sawblade and a highly pressurized stream of water.

“The circular and radius cuts are performed by a Waterjet that operates at over 90,000 PSI, and uses fine grains of garnet as a cutting agent to create greater friction.” Ryals explained.

After witnessing the entire digital stone manufacturing process from design to fabrication first-hand, the students sat down to a light lunch where they were able to interact with the accompanying Design Professionals and discuss their observations about the process.

Dr. Campbell stated that she was very pleased with the event and plans to make it a permanent part of the curriculum for her Interior Design Materials and Finishes course.

For information about hosting a group for a tour of Jackson Stoneworks digital stone manufacturing facility, contact their office at 352-372-6600 or email them at info@jacksonstoneworks.com.

Press Release: Gainesville Chamber Announces Transportation Sales Surtax Coalition

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September 15, 2014

Contact: Kamal I. Latham, VP of Public Policy
Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce
Phone: 352.378.2498
Email: Kamal@gainesvillechamber.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Gainesville Chamber Announces Transportation Sales Surtax Coalition

Moving Alachua County Forward Endorsed by Multiple Organizations

The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce that multiple organizations have endorsed Moving Alachua County Forward, the one-cent, eight-year, countywide transportation sales surtax referendum on the November 4, 2014 general election ballot to improve roads, bus service and bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure.

The Chamber and coalition members will share their rationale for endorsing the transportation sales surtaxduring apress conference on Thursday, September 18th at 9:30am at the Senior Recreation Center located at 5701 NW 34th Street, Gainesville, FL 32653.

The diverse coalition currently includes the following organizations:

Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce (Chamber)
Builders Association of North Central Florida (BANCF)
Gainesville-Alachua County Association of Realtors (GACAR)
Gainesville Citizens for Active Transportation (GCAT)
Community Coalition for Older Adults (CCOA)
African American Accountability Alliance (4As)
Alachua County Democratic Executive Committee (DEC)
Alachua County Emerging Leaders (ACEL)

Statements from each organization are below.

Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce (Chamber)
“The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce endorses Moving Alachua County Forward. The Chamber’s vision is for this region to be the global hub of talent, innovation and opportunity and we are committed to realizing this vision by supporting transportation infrastructure investment that would help this community move to the next level.”

- Tim Giuliani, President and CEO, Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce

Builders Association of North Central Florida (BANCF)
“Historically, the Builders Association of North Central Florida has not supported new taxes. However, the fact is that the condition of Alachua County’s roads is unacceptable. Alternative funding likely involves increasing property taxes. Therefore, the Builders Association supports the transportation surtax because improved roads will bring good growth and better quality of life for Alachua County residents.”

- Vinnie Moreschi, President, Builders Association of North Central Florida

Gainesville-Alachua County Association of Realtors (GACAR)
“GACAR is proud to support the transportation surtax that would improve Alachua County roads, improve bus service in the East Gainesville and SWAG areas, include bus turnouts on major corridors, and coordinate efforts with municipalities. The citizens oversight committee is the keystone piece that would ensure the intent and success of the surtax. If the surtax does not pass, property values could be adversely impacted due to further road degradation until another local funding option is found, which could be higher property taxes.”

- Gary Thomas, President, Gainesville-Alachua County Association of Realtors

Gainesville Citizens for Active Transportation (GCAT)
“Active transportation promotes health, enhances quality of life, and is economically beneficial for businesses and taxpayers. GCAT is pleased to endorse the Moving Alachua County Forward surtax, a comprehensive, multi-modal approach to improving transportation for all road users in Alachua County.”

- Chris Furlow, President, Gainesville Citizens for Active Transportation

Community Coalition for Older Adults (CCOA)
“Available and convenient transportation is essential for a cohesive community. This is especially true for older adults whose needs are greater. The CCOA supports the Transportation Sales Surtax, which will significantly help address these needs.”

- Jon Reiskind, Co-Chair, Community Coalition for Older Adults

African American Accountability Alliance (4As)
” The 4A’s PAC for the African American Accountability Alliance, Inc., (4As) is pleased to support the Moving Alachua County Forward County Wide Sales Surtax. This revenue will pay for much needed road improvements in our cities and unincorporated Alachua County. The surtax revenues will improve RTS Bus Transit Services for East Gainesville residents and provide transportation services for our seniors to our Senior Recreation Center.”

- Darry Lloyd, President, African American Accountability Alliance

Alachua County Democratic Executive Committee (DEC)
“The Alachua County Democratic Executive Committee is pleased to endorse passage of the Transportation Surtax as one of the ballot initiatives for the General Election, November 4.”

- Cynthia Moore Chestnut, Chair, Alachua County Democratic Executive Committee

Alachua County Emerging Leaders (ACEL)
“Alachua County Emerging Leaders is an organization of young professionals planting roots in this community. We strive to make our community not only a better place for young professionals to live, but also one that is sustainable for the long term. The Moving Alachua County Forward initiative hits the mark on both accounts through a diversity of investments in road, bus, and millions of dollars for cycling and pedestrian transportation amenities, the last of which have been a major focus for ACEL and its young professional members over the past two years. On behalf of the region’s young professionals and emerging leaders, we are proud to join with our community and publicly endorse this initiative.”

- Andrew Romero, President, Alachua County Emerging Leaders
andrew@acelfl.com, www.acelfl.com
About the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce
Formed in 1924, the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business in the Gainesville area. Representing pver 1,200 members that employ more than 70,000 employees, the Chamber is leading the effort to make the Gainesville region a global hub for talent, innovation, and opportunity. The Chamber is 5-star accredited by the United States Chamber of Commerce, putting it in the top 1% of all Chambers nationwide. Learn more at www.GainesvilleChamber.com or call us at 352.334.7100.

19 Kitchen Projects Every Homeowner Should Know About

by Mitchell Parker
Houzz Editorial Staff
These days the kitchen is the most important room in the house. We’re constantly calling it our main hub, where we cook fresh meals, entertain guests, do homework, post messages and, yes, every now and then watch TV. But with the increased focus on function comes a lot of stuff that needs fixing, replacing, tweaking, cleaning and organizing. For that you’ll need to arm yourself with some kitchen knowledge so you can stay on top of what’s most important. Here are 19 projects good for every home dweller to know about.
new kitchen sink
1. Choose a new kitchen sink. Is there anything in your kitchen that gets used as much as your sink? Doubtful. That’s why it’s important to choose the right one — size, width, style — for your space.
kitchen2
2. Pick a new kitchen faucet. Sure, a faucet is a must for practical tasks, but it also helps define the style of your kitchen.
Replace your kitchen faucet
3. Replace your kitchen faucet. This is a project that’s straightforward enough for many homeowners or a handy friend.
Reface, kitchen cabinets
4. Reface your kitchen cabinets. The costs of buying or building new cabinets can add up quick. Refacing might be a more affordable option for you — and can add 10 years of life to your cabinets.
Paint, cabinets
5. Paint your cabinets a new color. Maybe refacing isn’t what you need but a jazzy new paint color is. This is another more budget-friendly option than replacing, but the glossy finish on the woodwork may prove challenging for some DIYers.
cabinet door styles
6. Learn how to talk about kitchen cabinet door styles. Do you know what an inset, a partial overlay and a full overlay are? Well, these little pieces of knowledge will have a huge impact on how you view, design or remodel your kitchen.
cabinet knobs
7. Choose new cabinet knobs and pulls. This isn’t as easy as it sounds. There are countless styles of pulls, knobs, hinges and more to make sense of. Our ideabook helps you get started.
toe-kick storage
8. Add toe-kick storage. You know that unused space underneath your cabinets? It offers an amazing storage opportunity.
pantry and shelves
9. Organize everything. From the pantry and shelves to the cabinets and appliances, we accumulate a lot of stuff in our kitchens. What you need is a full-on game plan to get everything in order.
mail and message center
10. Build a mail and message center. Of course, clutter comes from outside the kitchen too, in the form of mail, notes, keys and more. Take control over the mess with your own message center.
white space
11. Keep your white space looking white. All-white kitchens are still all the rage. But also raging are homeowners trying to keep them clean. Learn a few key tips and tricks.
Clean tile grout
12. Clean tile grout. Is there anything on this planet that’s harder to clean than tile grout? Probably not. Here’s a tried and true method.
cutting board
13. Clean your cutting board. With all the action — and bacteria — your cutting boards and butcher blocks see, keeping them clean should be part of your routine.
right tools
14. Get the right tools for the job. A kitchen is useless without the right utensils and cookware to make it function. So what exactly do you need? Here’s where to start.
appliances
15. Shop for appliances wisely. No two ovens or microwaves or refrigerators are created equal. Here’s how to be a savvy shopper.
tablets and cookbooks
16. Make a stand for tablets and cookbooks. It sounds pretty basic, but this little accessory will make your life in the kitchen so much easier.
charging station
17. Make a funky charging station to hide all those wires. The onslaught of tech gadgets in our lives has happened much too quickly for our kitchens to keep up with, leaving us with vital counter space strewn with wires and devices. Here’s one creative way to reel them all in.
kitchen backsplash
18. Install a kitchen backsplash. A new kitchen backsplash can dramatically change the way your kitchen looks and feels. The great thing is that, if you’re choosing tile, it’s a project you might be able to do yourself.
Not up for doing it yourself? Then you should know how to hire and work with a pro to change your backsplash.
Add storage
19. Add storage to your backsplash for hanging pots, pans and utensils. Already got a backsplash but want to make better use of it? Installing systems for hanging utensils and pans is a great way to maximize that wall.

Oakmont extension among recent business developments

By 
The Gainesville Sun

The Alachua County Commission has approved an additional 10-year expansion for the development of the Oakmont subdivision, which includes 556 acres off Parker Road and Southwest 24th Avenue.

Although initially approved about 10 years ago, the economy “put a noose around the project, causing it to drag on a little longer,” said Rory Causseaux, CEO of civil engineering company Causseaux, Hewett & Walpole.

Phase one of the project, consisting of 233 of the 999 lots, is underway. Causseaux said the infrastructure construction should be done within the next month or two. Landscaping and aesthetic enhancements should then take about three to four months to be completed.

Future phases will be made up of 50 to 100 lots, he said. It is expected to take about eight to 10 years to have the remaining infrastructure built.

Model and speculative homes for phase one will be built within the next month.

The entire 999-lot project is predicted to take about 15 to 20 years to be completed, Causseaux said.

 

H.I. Resorts

Tampa-based real estate company H.I. Resorts is looking to rezone an area consisting of seven smaller properties along the south side of Old Archer Road, in the 3100-3300 block of Southwest Archer Road.

Clay Sweger, director of planning for EDA Engineers-Surveyors-Planners, said H.I. Resorts owns property to the southeast and aims to rezone the residential area to mixed-use for various projects, although no development plans have yet been made.

 

Comfort Inn

The Comfort Inn University at 3440 SW 40th Blvd. has been sold by a South California investment group to a local buyer, Gator Hospitality.

The new owners, who also own the Sleep Inn & Suites hotel on Southwest 40th Boulevard, plan on renovating the 83-room hotel.

A complete renovation of its lobby rooms will begin toward the end of the current football season to avoid disturbing guests visiting for games while the hotel remains open, said marketing director Andrea Leonor. All renovations are expected to be completed by January.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill is building a new store and donation center on the site of a former Wachovia Bank drive-in at Northwest 13th Street and 23rd Avenue. The new building will be about 14,300 square-feet and will replace its smaller thrift store at 2624 NW 13th St.

The store will accept donations via a covered drive-through as well as through its Goodwill trucks on site.

An opening date has been set for Nov. 1, said Goodwill spokeswoman Liz Morgan.

 

Master Fitness Gurus

A new fitness center is welcoming individuals of all ages and fitness levels, as well as trainers and fitness training experts to become a part of the Master Fitness Gurus gym.

The 2,000 square-foot facility offers personal training for men and women, fitness programs for children and seniors as well as sports training for athletes of all ages, said Vice President Tia Williams. There are a variety of different membership options, including specialty classes such as a cardio boxing or Olympic weightlifting class.

The gym had its grand opening at 3201 SW 42nd St., Suite 5, in mid-August and will have a ribbon-cutting event with the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 18.

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Reading Food Nutrition Labels

Learning how to read and understand food labels can help you make healthier choices.
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Here are some tips for making the most of the information on the Nutrition Facts label:

ucm_300131

Start here.

Note the size of a single serving and how many servings are in the package.

Check total calories per serving.

Look at the serving size and how many servings you’re really consuming. If you double the servings you eat, you double the calories and nutrients, including the Percent Daily Value (% DV).

Limit these nutrients.

Remember, you need to limit your total fat to no more than 56–78 grams a day — including no more than 16 grams of saturated fat, less than two grams of trans fat, and less than 300 mg cholesterol (for a 2,000 calorie diet).

Get enough of these nutrients.

Make sure you get 100 percent of the fiber, vitamins and other nutrients you need every day.

Quick guide to % DV.

The % DV section tells you the percent of each nutrient in a single serving, in terms of the daily recommended amount. As a guide, if you want to consume less of a nutrient (such as saturated fat, cholesterol or sodium), choose foods with a lower % DV — 5 percent or less is low. If you want to consume more of a nutrient (such as fiber), seek foods with a higher % DV — 20 percent or more is high.

Here are more tips for getting as much health information as possible from the Nutrition Facts label:

  • Remember that the information shown in these panels is based on 2,000 calories a day. You may need to consume less or more than 2,000 calories depending upon your age, gender, activity level, and whether you’re trying to lose, gain or maintain your weight. Find out your personal daily limits on My Fats Translator.
  • In general, as you think about the amount of calories in a food per serving, remember that for a 2,000-calorie diet:
    • 40 calories per serving is considered low;
    • 100 calories per serving is considered moderate; and
    • 400 calories or more per serving is considered high.
  • There is no % DV shown for trans fat on the panel because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not have enough scientific information to set this value. We recommend eating less than 20 calories or (less than two grams of trans fat) a day – that’s less than 1 percent of your total daily calories (for a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet).
  • When the Nutrition Facts panel says the food contains “0 g” of trans fat, it means the food contains less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving.
  • When the Nutrition Facts label says a food contains “0 g” of trans fat, but includes “partially hydrogenated oil” in the ingredient list, it means the food contains trans fat, but less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving. So, if you eat more than one serving, you could quickly reach your daily limit of trans fat.

In addition to the Nutrition Facts label, a lot of foods today also come with nutrient content claims provided by the manufacturer. These claims are typically featured in ads for the foods or in the promotional copy on the food packages themselves. They are strictly defined by the FDA. The chart below provides some of the most commonly used nutrient content claims, along with a detailed description of what the claim means.

Understanding Calories and Sugar Claims
If a food claims to be… It means that one serving of the product contains…
Calorie free Less than 5 calories
Sugar free Less than 0.5 grams of sugar
Understanding Fat Claims
If a food claims to be… It means that one serving of the product contains…
Fat free Less than 0.5 grams of fat
Low fat 3 grams of fat or less
Reduced fat or less fat At least 25 percent less fat than the regular product
Low in saturated fat 1 gram of saturated fat or less, with not more than 15 percent of the calories coming from saturated fat
Lean Less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol
Extra lean Less than 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol
Light (lite) At least one-third fewer calories or no more than half the fat of the regular product, or no more than half the sodium of the regular product
Understanding Cholesterol Claims
If a food claims to be… It means that one serving of the product contains…
Cholesterol free Less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol and 2 grams (or less) of saturated fat
Low cholesterol 20 or fewer milligrams of cholesterol and 2 grams or less of saturated fat
Reduced cholesterol At least 25 percent less cholesterol than the regular product and 2 grams or less of saturated fat
Understanding Sodium Claims
If a food claims to be… It means that one serving of the product contains…
Sodium free or no sodium Less than 5 milligrams of sodium and no sodium chloride in ingredients
Very low sodium 35 milligrams or less of sodium
Low sodium 140 milligrams or less of sodium
Reduced or less sodium At least 25 percent less sodium than the regular product
Understanding Fiber Claims
If a food claims to be… It means that one serving of the product contains…
High fiber 5 grams or more of fiber
Good source of fiber 2.5 to 4.9 grams of fiber

If you can’t remember the definitions of all of the terms, don’t worry. You can use these general guidelines instead:

  • “Free” means a food has the least possible amount of the specified nutrient.
  • “Very Low” and “Low” means the food has a little more than foods labeled “Free.”
  • “Reduced” or “Less” mean the food has 25 percent less of a specific nutrient than the regular version of the food.

Learn more:

  • See what big changes are in store for the food label!
shower power

9 Surprising Considerations for a Bathroom Remodel

Bathroom remodeling and design blend big dreams and practical realities. To make a bathroom work, it’s best to design from the fixtures and finishes backward to the walls and floor. The little things about an intimate room can make a huge difference in the day-to-day experience of it.

At the beginning of the process — the dream phase — the focus tends to be on color, layout, heated floors and moving things around. These are all important things, but if nobody is thinking about the stuff behind the walls and under the floors to make the overall design work well and affordably, the train will head off the tracks as soon as it leaves the station.

Here are nine things to think about at the outset of a bathroom project and at every step of construction.

bathroom remodel1. Problems under tile. Little things can become big, expensive problems in an old-house bathroom remodel. Subway wall tile and small black and white floor tiles are possible indicators of an older home. And when you talk about removing and replacing old tiles, you’re often talking “wet bed.”

A wet bed essentially means the tiles are sitting on a slab of concrete poured into the floor system — not how it’s done today. Wet-bed tiles are difficult and expensive to remove. Wall tiles may have several coats of concrete and maybe wire lath — brutal. You might want to settle for these tiles and spend your time and money elsewhere. Good thing vintage is in.

vintage bathroon2. Hiding the plumbing — or not. Think carefully about fixtures and all the stuff that’s connected to them as you lay out the plumbing, electrical and framing, not the other way around. This will help you avoid mistakes and do tighter work.

You may choose to leave plumbing supply lines exposed, as in the bathroom here, for a more industrial or vintage look. Or you may choose to hide them behind the sink pedestal for a more modern look. Little things make big impressions.

glass enclosure

3. Think threshold. Curbless showers are awesome, but for the water to flow into the drain, the floor has to be high enough to pitch the tile into the drain. When you add thickness to the floor, you have to think about the transitions into the room. If someone needs to wheel into the room, accommodations must be made.

bathroom trend

 

4. Privacy, please. Consider privacy, as bathrooms tend to be shared. I’m a big fan of toilet rooms. They’re pretty easy to install, and they make a master bath much more accommodating for two people who use it at the same time.

 

 

 

 

 

bathroom remodel

5. Do you want a warm floor? One of the biggest layout control points for a bathroom remodel is the door threshold. When you add a heated floor or curbless shower, this transition area is affected, so consider the implications carefully. The thicker the floor, the bigger this transition.

showers

6. Kill cold spots. For showers on outside walls with soap nooks (love them), tuck a piece of rigid foam insulation behind the backer board before you tile to minimize a cold spot inside the home.

Side-by-side sinks

7. Are two bathrooms better than one? You bet. Side-by-side sinks are great for large master baths. But for some couples, two small bathrooms work even better — each person gets a private nook. This may make for a smaller “master,” but it can make for a more awesome experience every day.

shower power

8. Shower power. Do you take a lot of baths? Do you like to luxuriate in the shower? Consider adding a ¾-inch supply line to the tub or shower for a more consistent, faster flow of water. It’s the opposite of a water-saving tip; this not-so-green idea would be a splurge.

bathroom

9. Water on the floor. Stand-alone showers are awesome features, but think about the bath mat that might abut it every day. And about traffic flow. There are no (or not many) mats that work with stalls that open at the corner, so you’re stuck with a bare floor on one side of the shower door and a bath mat on the other. And that means a puddle after every shower.

Tell us: What did you learn from your bathroom makeover?

 

 

Housing recovery returns

Housing recoveryEconomists noted that housing still hasn’t fully recovered from its slowdown earlier this year. The annual sales pace remains 4.3 percent below last July’s rate. And construction has merely returned to its pace in October; it has yet to exceed it.

The number of homes for sale rose 3.5 percent in July from June to 2.37 million, the most in nearly two years.

Affordability is improving. The median price slipped a bit in July from June to $222,900, the Realtors said.

And the average rate for a 30-year mortgage fell to 4.1 percent last week, the lowest level this year, according to mortgage giant Freddie Mac. At the start of the year, the average rate was 4.53 percent.

A study released last Thursday by data provider Zillow found that home buyers paid just 15.3 percent of their incomes on the mortgage for a typical home at the end of the April-June quarter. That’s much lower than the 22.1 percent share during the housing bubble that ended in 2006.

New homes

Fewer Americans bought new homes in July, evidence that the housing sector is struggling to gain traction more than five years into the economic recovery.

The Commerce Department said Monday that new-home sales fell 2.4 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 412,000. The report also revised up the June sales rate to 422,000 from 406,000.

New-home sales plunged 30.8 percent in the Northeast, followed by smaller drop-offs in the Midwest and West. Purchases were up 8.1 percent in the South, a region that usually accounts for more than half of all new-home sales.

Inventory of new homes on the market rose to six months, a level last reached in October 2011. The median price of a new home last month was $269,800, up 2.9 percent over the past 12 months.

Economists noted that housing still hasn’t fully recovered from its slowdown earlier this year. The annual sales pace remains 4.3 percent below last July’s rate. And construction has merely returned to its pace in October; it has yet to exceed it.

The number of homes for sale rose 3.5 percent in July from June to 2.37 million, the most in nearly two years.

Affordability is improving. The median price slipped a bit in July from June to $222,900, the Realtors said.

And the average rate for a 30-year mortgage fell to 4.1 percent last week, the lowest level this year, according to mortgage giant Freddie Mac. At the start of the year, the average rate was 4.53 percent.

A study released last Thursday by data provider Zillow found that home buyers paid just 15.3 percent of their incomes on the mortgage for a typical home at the end of the April-June quarter. That’s much lower than the 22.1 percent share during the housing bubble that ended in 2006.

New homes

Fewer Americans bought new homes in July, evidence that the housing sector is struggling to gain traction more than five years into the economic recovery.

The Commerce Department said Monday that new-home sales fell 2.4 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 412,000. The report also revised up the June sales rate to 422,000 from 406,000.

New-home sales plunged 30.8 percent in the Northeast, followed by smaller drop-offs in the Midwest and West. Purchases were up 8.1 percent in the South, a region that usually accounts for more than half of all new-home sales.

Inventory of new homes on the market rose to six months, a level last reached in October 2011. The median price of a new home last month was $269,800, up 2.9 percent over the past 12 months.

But the steady rebound in construction coming out of the Great Recession has stalled. Sales lost much of their momentum beginning last October, derailed by modest wage growth, a bump in mortgage rates and many builders focusing more on rental apartments and high-end homes for wealthier buyers.

The monthly sales data can be extremely volatile, yet the trend line shows that the market for new homes is “running in place,” said Richard Moody, chief economist at Regions Financial.

Eating When Not Hungry

Binge Eating

Does this sound like you — able to control your portions sometimes but losing control and uncontrollably eating large amounts of food at other times? This is called “binge eating” and lots of people do it.

A binge is when you eat a lot of food in a short time and it’s usually not healthy food. Binge eating is bad for you, especially if you have diabetes.

health tip

Emotional Eating

Many people eat when they feel upset, angry, sad, lonely or fearful. Emotions such as these can be powerful triggers to eat.

If you’re an emotional eater, you can learn other ways to react to your emotions. Emotions usually don’t last long — often just 10 minutes to an hour — so you only need to distract yourself from eating for a short time, until the emotion passes, like going for a 10-minutes walk around the block.

Nighttime Eating

For many people, dinner is only the start of their nighttime eating. There’s nothing wrong with a healthy snack such as fruit, plain popcorn or whole-wheat toast with a little jam a couple of hours after dinner. However, nighttime eating is a problem when you eat large amounts of food or foods high in saturated fat, sodium and calories like cookies, chips, full-fat ice cream, sandwiches or leftovers.

If nighttime eating is a problem for you, try to eat most of your calories during daylight hours. Reach for a light, healthy snack in the evening.

Instead of Try
Cookies 1 piece whole-wheat toast with jam
Candy 1 piece fresh fruit
Chips 2 cups low-fat. lower-salt popcorn
Cheese and crackers ½ to 1 cup fat-free or 1% cottage cheese
Pizza ½ to 1 cup of veggies, raw or leftover from dinner
Ice cream ½ to 1 cup low-fat yogurt (flavored or plain)

To help control binge, emotional and nighttime eating:

  • Get into the habit of eating three meals a day — breakfast, lunch and dinner — so you never get too hungry.
  • Don’t keep binge foods at home. If you’re a binge eater, you know which foods you usually eat during a binge. Common binge foods are cookies, candy bars, ice cream or chips.
  • Make a list of other things you’ll do. Here are some suggestions:
    • Take a walk or enjoy another physical activity for at least 10 to 15 minutes.
    • Talk to a friend who can help you get your feelings under control.
    • Do something you enjoy, like reading, playing or listening to music, playing with pets or children, handcrafts or taking a long hot bath.
    • Do some physical work, such as gardening or housecleaning.

If these behaviors become regular occurrences, speak to your healthcare provider about what you can do.

 

 

Celebrating 30 Years Together, The Beatles Tribute Band

CITY OF GAINESVILLE

 Parks, Recreation and Cultural                                                               Affairs Department

           RELEASE DATE:  August 29, 2014                                CONTACT: David Ballard, Event Coordinator
Email: ballarddg@cityofgainesville.org
Telephone: 352-393-8746

Celebrating 30 Years Together, The Beatles Tribute Band, The Impostors, Performs at “Free Fridays” on Sept. 19

GAINESVILLE, Fla. - The City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department will host The Beatles tribute band, The Impostors, at the “Free Fridays” Concert Series Friday, Sept. 19.

beattleFifty years ago, The Beatles forever changed the face of popular music in America with their 1964 performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Celebrating 30 years together, as a Beatles tribute band, The Impostors are one of Gainesville’s most popular local groups featuring some of the area’s most accomplished musicians.

According to band co-founder Michael Derry, “We’ve been together over three times as long as the Beatles were, so we’re hoping that at some point, longevity will catch up to quality.” “Free Fridays” Concert Series coordinator David Ballard says, “Whenever The Impostors play at ‘Free Fridays,’ they always draw a huge and enthusiastic crowd.”

The Impostors play a wide selection of The Beatles’ favorites from the popular hits of the early heydays, through the experimental era of the “Revolver” and “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” albums, to the “Abbey Road” album and the final rooftop appearance. The Impostors are known to occasionally throw in some great covers of other groups such as The Byrds, The Hollies, Jimi Hendrix, Neil Young and The Left Banke. The group will also include an original song for the first time in the “Free Fridays” concert.

The Impostors include local musicians Michael Derry (guitar/vocals), Mike Boulware (guitar/vocals), Don David (guitar/vocals), Ron Thomas (bass/vocals), Brad Bangstad (keyboards), Rob Rothschild (drums) and Brenda Derry (keyboards).

The Impostors concert is one of the select “Free Fridays” classic rock concerts that are sponsored by classic rock radio station WIND-FM (92.5, 95.5, 107.9).

The 2014 “Free Fridays” concert series is produced by the City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department.  This activity has been funded in part by a Tourist Development Tax Grant from the Alachua County Board of County Commissioners in conjunction with the Alachua County Tourist Development Council, a grant from the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, and a sponsorship from the Downtown Hampton Inn & Suites. The concerts will play each Friday night this year from Friday, May 2 through Friday, Oct. 24 from 8-10 p.m. at the Bo Diddley Community Plaza, which is located at 111 E. University Ave. To view the complete “Free Fridays” 2014 schedule, please visit the Cultural Affairs Division website at www.gvlculturalaffairs.org. For more information on “Free Fridays,” or to schedule an interview, please contact David Ballard at 352-393-8746.