Houzzers on Houzz.com Say

Houzzers on Houzz.com Say: Dream Kitchen Must-Haves

 

by Becky Harris

Houzzers on Houzz.com Say

 

The kitchen above one among many must have for kitchens. This kitchen features a Pot filler. This handy faucet means no more having to schlep a heavy pasta pot full of water from the sink to the stove-top.

Bianco Antico: Granite

Bianco Antico: Granite used in kitchen above

The Granite counter top featured in this display is called Bianco Antico and isoffered in our Jackson Stoneworks Stoneyard, located on 1111 SW 22nd Ave, Gainesville, FL.

 

 

Hidden knife storageThe Kitchen below features a Hidden knife storage. These boxes pop up from the counter. Similar systems exist for storing other items, like herbs and even iPod devices.

Big cabinet drawers. Houzzers want to make the most of every square inch of storage space. Big drawers, especially those with dish racks and other inserts, maximize bottom cabinets’ storage potential.

Kitchen and Bath

Kitchen Remodel Costs: The Mid- to-Upper-Range Kitchen Remodel

by Bud Dietrich, Houzz.com contributor 

Kitchen and BathSeems that whenever I meet a potential new client, the first question is, “How much will this project cost?” I then try to explain that this is like asking, “How long is a piece of string?”
 

You see, there are just too many things that will influence a project’s cost. From basic construction issues, such as repairing what may need repairs, to client selections for cabinets, appliances and everything else, to whether or not we plan on moving things around or adding space, there are so many variables that come into play.

What if the existing kitchen layout doesn’t work? Maybe you want more space because you really love to bake and want a place to roll and cut out all those holiday cookies. Or a kitchen island is something you’ve always wanted so that friends and family can sit nearby as you display your culinary skills.

A $40,000 to $75,000 kitchen remodel might include:

 1. A total rework of the space. Everything, including the kitchen sink, may need to be moved, which means new plumbing, electrical, air ducts and so on. 

2. Professional-style appliances. From the 48-inch built-in stainless steel refrigerator to the 48-inch cooktop with grille and griddle to the 30-inch double convection ovens, this kitchen is all about creating wonderful meals.

3. Custom island. And if you want an island, why not make it like some large piece of furniture with legs and beadboard? It’s a perfect place for the kids to sit and do homework while the evening meal is being prepared.

 

4. Custom cabinetry. Beaded, inset doors of clear alder with a custom stain and glaze in nonstandard sizes with all the accessories make for a beautiful and functional kitchen at a cost.

5. Designer hardware. Forget about using big-box knobs and handles. Take the time to find the pieces that are special. After all, you will be using these things constantly.

6. Wood flooring. Wood or porcelain tile or a stone floor will be more costly than a vinyl tile or sheet.

 

7. Stone counters and a glass tile backsplash. A quartz or natural stone material such as granite will certainly be more costly than a laminate top. For some, the look and feel of these materials is worth the extra cost. And while laminate may start to look used and nicked up in a few years, stone will be fresh and new looking for years, even decades, after first being installed.

 

8. Custom storage. With custom cabinets, you don’t have to settle for what’s stocked. So if you want a cabinet designed to handle small appliances with drop-down doors that become extra counter space, custom is the only way to go. 

Kitchen and Bath Article

Kitchen and Bath Tour of the Parade of Homes Part II

This week we continue our Tour of the Kitchens and Baths of the Parade of Homes with three gorgeous homes in the NW area, starting out with a scenic drive up US 441 to the Oak Ridge development in High Springs.  The booming biotech industry that has cropped up in the area in recent years has builders in Alachua and High Springs diligently preparing new homes for the growing population of employees of these firms.

Howe’s Parade

Kitchen and Bath

Home in Oak Ridge features a large Santa Cecilia granite island in the kitchen that has ample overhang to accommodate high top chairs or bar stools to create a more social setting.

Kitchen and Bath

The master bathroom of this home also features natural stone counter tops. New Caledonia granite adorns the double vanity and sets the tone for the entire space by creating a clean and refined look for  the room.

 

Kitchen counter tops in Gainesville

On our return trip to Gainesville, we veer off of 441 onto CR 241 for a pleasant drive through the countryside to Millhopper Rd, where we head eastward winding through picturesque cypress hammocks and under canopies of stately oaks on our way to another beautiful home by Howe Development in Millhopper Forrest.

Kitchen and bath granite counter tops in gainesvill

 

The all-white kitchen most striking visual when entering this lovely home. The White Carrara marble perfectly accents the white cabinetry to create a very clean look and feel in this kitchen.

Counter tops in Gainesville Florida

 

The master bath

features matching his and hers Blue Pearl granite vanities that provide eye-catching contrast to the white cabinets in this space. The Vanilla granite vanity top in one guest bath is crowned by an decorative vessel sink, while the second guest bath has a traditional under mount sink topped with New Caledonia granite.

 

 

We now wind our way back down Millhopper and onto CR 241 once again to head south past acres of lush pasture land and mossy oak groves to the Turnberry
Lake subdivision for a tour of GW Robinson’s 4 Br 3 ½ Ba Parade home.

Kitchen and Bath counter top in Gainesville

Kitchen and bath granite countert tops

The spacious open kitchen of this beautifully designed home has a double island design  featuring Carrara Graniti stone that sets the tone for the rest of the home.

Kitchen and bath counter tops

The spacious open kitchen of this beautifully designed home has a double island design  featuring Carrara Graniti stone that sets the tone for the rest of the home.

 

I hope our Tour has whet your appetite to go out this weekend for the final two days of the 2014 Parade and visit these beautifully designed homes from the areas premier builders  for yourself. We hope to see you there.

Homeowner’s Workbook: How to Remodel Your Kitchen

Kitchen and Bath

Rebekah Zaveloff
Houzz contributor & founder/ principal designer at KitchenLab
You’ve decided to remodel your kitchen. Now what? Not knowing where to start, many homeowners fall into two camps. Some start by looking at appliances. Others start by collecting inspiring kitchen photos. Some decide they need more room. Others simply want to upgrade their current kitchen. Homeowners may find themselves in this exploration stage for a year or longer before they start interviewing kitchen designers or general contractors.

Once you’ve pondered long enough and you’re ready to
green-light a kitchen remodeling project, then what? We’ll start with the first 9 steps and we’ll get into the nitty-gritty details under specific steps as we move through the complete workbook.

kitchen1Step 1: Think about what you need

This step is all about how you use your kitchen, and finding the layout and features that fit your household’s lifestyle. Get ideas from every resource possible, including Houzz guides and photos, showrooms, books, magazines and blogs.

Think about your priorities: how many people will be cooking and gathering here, and how they’ll need to move around in it. Do you need an addition? Or can you work with your existing kitchen footprint?

If you haven’t already, start saving photos of kitchens with features that suit your style. Your collection can be organized and beautiful like a scrapbook or it can be filled with random, unorganized images. I actually prefer the latter, because I like to randomly stuff images into my folders and ideabooks and go back to them later on for edits.

How to Organize Your Ideas
Kitchen and Bath
Step 2: Research and plan

Ready to green-light that project and take the plunge? The best place to start is by formulating what’s commonly referred to as a scope of work and figuring out your preliminary budget.

Both of these may be subject to change, so don’t feel like you have only once chance at this. Budget and scope are intertwined and often change many times during the design process as you become more educated and able to reconcile what you want and what you can afford. As a homeowner, you’re not expected to walk into this knowing what everything should cost. Remember, this is an educational process.

How to Map Our Your Scope of Work | 3 Common Kitchen Budgets

Step 3: Find the professionals you will need

Even if you’re going the DIY route, unless you’re building your own kitchen cabinets and doing your own electrical and plumbing, you’re going to have to work with a professional at some point. It may be as brief as leaning on your salesperson to help you in selecting and ordering your appliances or cabinets, but it’s something to plan on either way.

Some people start by visiting big-box stores or cabinet showrooms where they can see everything. Many homeowners get referrals from friends or colleagues and start by hiring an architect or designer. Still others might work on their own with a builder or contractor. Pros are available to help you with everything from contracts and permits to space planning, budgets, choosing finishes and fixtures, shopping, ordering products, helping you set up a temporary kitchen, and managing your project from start to finish.

Kitchen and Bath

Step 4: Schematic design

This phase includes sketches, space planning, preliminary floor plans and elevations showing the layout and cabinet sizes. I try to keep my clients focused more on layout and space planning, even though the temptation is to talk about what the kitchen will look like. But I find that getting caught up in the look too early can distract from the space planning phase.

Plus, you need a plan in order to figure out what materials will go where, and how many square feet you will need, and ultimately how much this will cost. I like to begin the contractor interview process early and give them a preliminary drawing packet and scope of work so we can get some ballpark construction numbers. At the same time you can be sending out drawings for estimates on some top choices of finishes and fixtures.

Step 5: Fixture and finish specification

Throughout this process, and probably long before, you have been saving photos of kitchens you love into your ideabooks and folders. You’ve found your style, whether it’s modern, classic, traditional, cottage or a personal style in between. You probably know if you want a white kitchen, a natural wood kitchen, or some color.

Now you need to make your final selection of finishes and fixtures. This usually includes:

  • Cabinetry construction type, doorstyle, finish and color
  • Countertop material
  • Refrigerators and other appliances
  • Kitchen sink and faucet
  • Light fixtures
  • Flooring
  • Backsplash
  • Decorative hardware

Kitchen and Bath

Step 6: Work on design development and construction documents

This is the stage when you finalize the design and prepare final floor plans, elevations, details and, if applicable, mechanical and electrical drawings, lighting switch plans, and exterior elevations.

This is where your final permit set or Construction Drawings (CDs) come into play. It’s important to have finishes and fixtures selected at this time, since this is what will be considered in the final pricing from the contractor.

You’ll submit drawings for permits. These have a lead time, so check the timing with your local village. You’ll need an architect, designer or licensed contractor signed up to finalize the paperwork and pick up your permits, so get ready to hire someone in the next step. I often find that we’re submitting for permits around the same time or a little bit after we’ve placed the cabinet order, due to similar lead times.

Step 7: Get contractor estimates

If you don’t already have a licensed contractor on your project, your next step is to find one to carry the project through. I always recommend to my clients to get at least 3 different contractor estimates. I like to do preliminary walk-throughs with the contractors once the schematic designs are done so we can get some ballpark estimates and find out if we’re on the right track or need to pull back some to fit the budget.

Step 8: Get ready for demo

The big day is upon us, most likely something like 4-8 weeks from when you submitted for permits. Time to get that schedule firmed up and plan on cleaning out the cabinets, putting what you don’t need in storage and — if you’re living in the house during construction — setting up a temporary kitchen so you don’t lose your mind!

You may be moving out of your house temporarily, but most homeowners white-knuckle it and try to live in the house through construction. Preparation and organization can save your sanity.

Discuss the logistics ahead of time with your contractor. Will you meet once a week for updates? Will you have to be out of the house for certain tasks like demo or flooring? What about debris removal and dust? Are there any family allergy issues? What is a typical work day for the crew? Getting all this on the table beforehand can set expectations and make for a smoother ride.

Step 9: Surviving the dreaded punch list

Once construction is over, well … almost over … there’s always this annoying little list of items that are missing, wrong, or simply forgotten about. A missing light switch plate, a caulk line that shrank and pulled away from the wall, paint touch ups — small things like this, and sometimes bigger things like the hood doesn’t work, or there’s a big scratch in the newly refinished floor.

Sometimes the homeowner does the punch list. It can be as informal as an emailed list of items that need to be fixed or finished. I like to use a little form I put together that identifies the item to be fixed or finished, the responsible party and the date of completion. I send it to the client for review, changes and additions, and then off to the contractor.

It’s inevitable that the contractor may have to make multiple visits back to the house to finish these items; prepare yourself for more than one visit and you’ll be fine.The best way to approach this is with a Zen attitude. Things happen, little things get missed. It’s sort of like making a list for the grocery store and still forgetting some key ingredient. We all do it.

 

Healthy Recipes

Kitchen and Bath by Jackson StoneworksGood nutrition is one way to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Making these healthy but tasty dishes at home can help you control your cholesterol levels, blood pressure or diabetes. We’ve created these recipes to help you prepare meals that not only taste great, but are good for you.

Low-Cholesterol Recipes
These recipes will help you avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering foods.

Discover how easy it is to avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering dishes. These recipes are brought to you exclusively online by the American Heart Association’s Patient Education program. Check back here for new recipes posted several times a year!

Breakfast and Fruits

Toast-and-Egg Cups
Say goodbye to ho-hum breakfasts with this veggie-filled egg cup, made extra flavorful with baby bella mushrooms.

Creamy Apricot Oatmeal
Warm, comforting, and healthy, too—a bowl of oatmeal is all those things. You won’t want to add sugar and milk once you’ve tasted how good the apricots and yogurt make this quick-and-easy breakfast dish.

Potato and Egg Scramble

A topping of stewed tomatoes adds a zesty zip to this hearty potato and egg breakfast dish.

Salads
Chicken Rotini Salad with Rosemary
The combination of bright green spinach, rich red tomatoes, and shiny black olives makes this salad pop with color as well as taste.SidesChilled Asian Asparagus Spears
A cool and tangy change from the usual cooked asparagus, this dish is perfect as a complement to an entrée or as an elegant party appetizer.Black Bean and Brown Rice Salad
Fresh cilantro adds its clean taste and lime juice provides a tangy zing to this fiber-rich salad.

Lemon Green Beans with Parsley and Almonds

The lively taste of lemon and the wonderful crunch of dry-roasted almonds add the perfect accents to fresh green beans.Marinated Vegetable Salad
The vibrant colors and flavors of this salad add pizzazz to any meal.Savory Sweet Potato Fries

Savory seasonings provide zesty flavor to vibrantly colored, nutrition-rich oven-fried sweet potatoes.Main Dishes

Greek Meatball and Orzo Soup
Shredded carrot adds moistness to these meatballs, which are the stars of this satisfying soup.   

Mediterranean Seafood Stew

It doesn’t take long to prep and cook this comforting stew, so it’s a great choice for dinner after a busy day. The stew’s very mild fish flavor should appeal even to people who usually aren’t seafood lovers.

Bunless Beef-and-Bean Burgers
Hearty, bunless burger recipe that calls for less ground beef which adds up to less cholesterol and saturated fat.

No-Bake Veggie Lasagna Stacks
A delicious lasagna recipe that doesn’t require hours in the kitchen.  You can make these lasagna stacks up to five days in advance and just heat them up in the microwave when you are ready to eat.

Layered Mexican Casserole
A spritz of fresh lime juice is the perfect finishing touch to this casserole, which is a handy way for using up leftover chicken breasts.

Lemony Tilapia and Asparagus Grill

Dinner is so quick and easy when you grill tilapia and asparagus side by side. A combination of chili powder and lemon pepper enhances the mild flavor of the fish, and a seasoned vinegar and oil mixture adds flair to the asparagus.

Lettuce-Wrap Tacos with Black Beans and Corn
These tacos don’t require any cooking, which makes it easy for you to put together a quick lunch and be on your way.

Desserts

Chocolate Pudding Cake

Rich and gooey, this easy-to-prepare pudding cake is intensely satisfying. It magically bakes into two distinct layers, one cakelike and the other a chocolate pudding sauce.

Strawberry Breakfast Mousse Creme

No more skipping breakfast! This breakfast treat, even creamier than the typical mousse, is a fabulously cool way to begin the day. You can even make it up to 24 hours in advance.

 

 

Low-Sodium Recipes
Discover how delicious low-sodium meals can be, especially when you replace salt with herbs and spices.

Diabetes-Friendly Recipes
Living with type 2 diabetes means that eating a healthy, balanced diet can be a challenge.

More Heart-Healthy Recipes
Find even more tasty bites that will make your heart and taste buds happy.

Healthy Recipes

Kitchen and Bath by Jackson StoneworksGood nutrition is one way to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Making these healthy but tasty dishes at home can help you control your cholesterol levels, blood pressure or diabetes. We’ve created these recipes to help you prepare meals that not only taste great, but are good for you.

Low-Cholesterol Recipes
These recipes will help you avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering foods.

Discover how easy it is to avoid excess saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol while enjoying mouth-watering dishes. These recipes are brought to you exclusively online by the American Heart Association’s Patient Education program. Check back here for new recipes posted several times a year!

Breakfast and Fruits

Toast-and-Egg Cups
Say goodbye to ho-hum breakfasts with this veggie-filled egg cup, made extra flavorful with baby bella mushrooms.

Creamy Apricot Oatmeal
Warm, comforting, and healthy, too—a bowl of oatmeal is all those things. You won’t want to add sugar and milk once you’ve tasted how good the apricots and yogurt make this quick-and-easy breakfast dish.

Potato and Egg Scramble

A topping of stewed tomatoes adds a zesty zip to this hearty potato and egg breakfast dish.

Salads
Chicken Rotini Salad with Rosemary
The combination of bright green spinach, rich red tomatoes, and shiny black olives makes this salad pop with color as well as taste.SidesChilled Asian Asparagus Spears
A cool and tangy change from the usual cooked asparagus, this dish is perfect as a complement to an entrée or as an elegant party appetizer.Black Bean and Brown Rice Salad
Fresh cilantro adds its clean taste and lime juice provides a tangy zing to this fiber-rich salad.

Lemon Green Beans with Parsley and Almonds

The lively taste of lemon and the wonderful crunch of dry-roasted almonds add the perfect accents to fresh green beans.Marinated Vegetable Salad
The vibrant colors and flavors of this salad add pizzazz to any meal.Savory Sweet Potato Fries

Savory seasonings provide zesty flavor to vibrantly colored, nutrition-rich oven-fried sweet potatoes.Main Dishes

Greek Meatball and Orzo Soup
Shredded carrot adds moistness to these meatballs, which are the stars of this satisfying soup.   

Mediterranean Seafood Stew

It doesn’t take long to prep and cook this comforting stew, so it’s a great choice for dinner after a busy day. The stew’s very mild fish flavor should appeal even to people who usually aren’t seafood lovers.

Bunless Beef-and-Bean Burgers
Hearty, bunless burger recipe that calls for less ground beef which adds up to less cholesterol and saturated fat.

No-Bake Veggie Lasagna Stacks
A delicious lasagna recipe that doesn’t require hours in the kitchen.  You can make these lasagna stacks up to five days in advance and just heat them up in the microwave when you are ready to eat.

Layered Mexican Casserole
A spritz of fresh lime juice is the perfect finishing touch to this casserole, which is a handy way for using up leftover chicken breasts.

Lemony Tilapia and Asparagus Grill

Dinner is so quick and easy when you grill tilapia and asparagus side by side. A combination of chili powder and lemon pepper enhances the mild flavor of the fish, and a seasoned vinegar and oil mixture adds flair to the asparagus.

Lettuce-Wrap Tacos with Black Beans and Corn
These tacos don’t require any cooking, which makes it easy for you to put together a quick lunch and be on your way.

Desserts

Chocolate Pudding Cake

Rich and gooey, this easy-to-prepare pudding cake is intensely satisfying. It magically bakes into two distinct layers, one cakelike and the other a chocolate pudding sauce.

Strawberry Breakfast Mousse Creme

No more skipping breakfast! This breakfast treat, even creamier than the typical mousse, is a fabulously cool way to begin the day. You can even make it up to 24 hours in advance.

 

 

Low-Sodium Recipes
Discover how delicious low-sodium meals can be, especially when you replace salt with herbs and spices.

Diabetes-Friendly Recipes
Living with type 2 diabetes means that eating a healthy, balanced diet can be a challenge.

More Heart-Healthy Recipes
Find even more tasty bites that will make your heart and taste buds happy.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

What to Shop for in Cabinet Hardware and Millwork

Untitled-18

Anne Higuera CGR, CAPS
Houzz Contributor and Seattle remodeler.

 

Once you’ve decided whether your cabinets will be painted or stain-grade, how the boxes and doors will be constructed, and what style of doors they’ll feature, there are still some final decisions that need to be made. The cabinets’ hardware and millwork will help determine how the units look and function — and will also have a big impact on the cost.

Kitchen and Bath

Hardware. Hardware has come a long way from the days of visible, face-mounted hinges and no drawer guides. (Drawers would just slide over internal wood supports.) Now consumers can choose from a panoply of beautifully engineered and inventive options.Kitchen and Bath

Hinges. Most cabinets sold now don’t have visible door hinges. These concealed workhorses fit neatly into routered spaces inside the door, and some interesting upgrades are available.

The simplest concealed hardware is usually still adjustable, allowing up-and-down and side-to-side movement on the cabinet face, so that the doors can line up with no obvious gaps. Over time they may go out of adjustment, so having the ability to tune up your cabinets with just a screwdriver is a nice option.

Some hinges are soft-close, meaning that the hinge catches the door before it slams into the cabinet box, and slowly allows it to finish closing. This is useful not only for noise control, but also to prevent your doors from breaking from repeated banging over the years.

Kitchen and Bath

Guides. Drawer guides, also called glides or slides, come in a variety of materials and functions. The least expensive are made of plastic and metal, and may open only 75 percent of the way, leaving a quarter of the drawer still in the cabinet. These guides may also not be strong enough to carry heavy loads, like lots of dishes or canned goods.

Kitchen and Bath

All-metal guides can carry more weight, but additional considerations, like the kind of rollers (nylon, metal or ball bearing), can impact performance. Full-extension guides allow the drawer to be opened completely. Making sure the guides can carry the likely weight of the drawer and its contents is important for long-term performance. There is also an opportunity to make these soft-close, which adds to the cost.

Kitchen and Bath

If you have inset or partial-overlay cabinets, the guides may be installed on wood blocks inside the cabinet to line up with the drawers. With full-overlay or Euro-style cabinets, the guides are mounted directly onto the cabinet box to maximize space inside.

Kitchen and Bath

Specialty hardware. The biggest conundrum in any kitchen is the corner cabinet. How can you access everything in there? Shelving? Lazy Susan?

While both of those options are still regularly used, some innovative new hardware fittings allow the space to function at its highest potential.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

There are some great pullout options that display the contents of the cabinet. You’ll also findspecialty options, like lifts for a KitchenAid mixer (and other work surface extensions), pull-down shelving for high cabinets, pullouts for trash and recycling, tilt-out panels for sponges, units for storing canned goods and even in-counter composting. Be sure to ask about all of the options.

 

 

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Millwork. When your cabinets arrive for installation, the first thing that will happen is that the boxes are installed — often using small, thin pieces of wood called shims to make everything level. Once the boxes are in, the final finishes will be installed, making up the millwork portion of the cabinets.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Millwork can come in stock dimensions and profiles, can be produced to match existing trim in other parts of the home or can be made new.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

O.B. Williams Company in Seattle has an enormous millwork library with many of the profiles it has made over the years.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

The knives used to mill the wood are saved, so that a profile can be selected and milled again. Or new custom molding can be made.

 

 

 

 

 

Kitchen and Bath of GainesvilleCrowns. Crown molding is often used at the top of cabinets to create a finished crown around the top. Crown molding can be elaborate or very simple. The key is to make a deliberate decision when the cabinets are ordered about whether the upper cabinets will go to the ceiling (with the crown installed flat against the ceiling) or held off from the ceiling by a few inches or more, leaving a space between the crown and the ceiling.

 

 

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

A primary reason for the height falling short of the ceiling is uneven ceilings, which most older homes and, unfortunately, some newer homes have. If you would like a flush (flat-with-the-ceiling) installation, the ceilings need to be level. That might mean adding on to the ceiling joists so that when Sheetrock is installed, the ceiling is perfectly flat and level. Some would rather avoid this added cost, so they opt to end the cabinets lower.

One more thing to consider at the top of your cabinets if they stop short of the ceiling: a plywood cap. Plywood can be installed inside the crown, so that it’s not visible from the front, but so it covers the top of the box, which is generally uneven and a dust collector. This is particularly important if there are adjacent stairs that make the tops of the cabinets visible, or if you want to display items on top of the cabinets.

Kitchen and Bath of GainesvilleValances. A valance serves a similar purpose on the bottoms of upper cabinets. This piece of wood is usually mounted on the front of the cabinet below the door to conceal undercabinet lighting and to block the view of the unfinished cabinet bottoms. There may be different valance options, so ask.

 

 

 

Kitchen and Bath of GainesevilleScribes. These are also known as filler pieces and are made out of the same wood species or painted the same as the rest of the cabinet. Scribes are used to provide a little wiggle room where the cabinets come together and where they meet the walls. They are cut to size and fit tight to adjacent walls, cabinets and some appliances to create a truly built-in look.

 

 

 

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Toe kicks. A toe kick is the finish material installed in front of the cabinet base. It’s usually the very last piece of cabinet millwork installed, and goes in after the finished floor.

After the millwork is in, all of the doors and drawers can go back on, as they are usually removed when the boxes are installed to avoid damage.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Inserts. The final pieces installed with cabinets are inserts — like knife blocks and plate organizers — and the knobs and pulls that allow you to open all the doors and drawers.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Handles can be large, flashy, understated or whimsical. The important thing is that they work with the design of your cabinets, don’t impede the opening of adjacent cabinets (which can happen) and aren’t pocket catchers (meaning they don’t catch your clothing as you walk by or make it difficult to use surfaces).

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville

Knowing the subtleties of cabinet construction and finishes will help you make decisions that fit your budget, your lifestyle and your aesthetics. Whether custom, semicustom, off-the-shelf or ready-to-assemble stock cabinets, there are many, many options to make your cabinets work best for you.

Kitchen and Bath in Gainesville

Get More From Your Kitchen Island

Kitchen and bath article

Kathryn Peltier
Houzz Contributor
Many kitchen islands open directly into another room. If you don’t require seating on that other side of your island, it’s a great opportunity to make the island serve purposes other than cooking and eating. When planning for an island, consider how it can be used to your advantage, whether it’s incorporating additional display space, extra storage or even strategically separating — or connecting — other spaces. Here’s how you can make your island work harder for you.
kitchen and bath of Gaineville
Get More Display and StorageThese open shelves wrap around the island to create display space on two sides. This makes for a much more eye-catching addition in an open floor plan. Can you imagine staring at solid planes of material here? Meanwhile, a small countertop at the opposite end still accommodates some island seating.

kitchen3
Where seating is not required, think about incorporating bookshelves along the length of your island — perfect for all those cookbooks.
Kitchen and Bath in Gainesville
Full-height cabinets block kitchen messes, provide storage and Kitchen and Bathhold a TV here.
Get a Divider or TransitionA simple, narrow dividing wall, which seemingly arises from the island, partially hides the cooking area and creates a stunning art wall. Notice how the sculpture niche is finished to match the cabinetry, creating the transition from kitchen to the living-dining area.

Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville
This island does double duty with a working kitchen side and a buffet dining side, but it doesn’t stop there: The beautifully detailed end wall hides any mess and creates a lovely focal point.
Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville
In this very open space, the island ends in a fabulous display area that looks like furniture. This concept blurs the line between cooking and living areas.
Kitchen and Bath of Gainesville
Want to hide your dirty dishes but still converse with the guests? Use meticulously detailed cabinetry as a horizontal backdrop to your dining area — much more interesting than drywall. A narrow continuation of the countertop even serves as a buffet space.
Kitchen and Bath in Gainesville
In the same space seen from the kitchen side, small cabinets actually form the top of the dining “wall” and provide storage — bonus!
Kitchen and Bath in Gainesville
Get Table SeatingIn this kitchen a working island is paired with a built-in banquette, making an attractive, handy spot for dining. This would work equally well with a rectangular island.

Kitchen and Bath
Ease a Level ChangeMany homes have a step or two from the kitchen to a living area, typically with a railing of some sort. Why not create a casual dining area as a buffer between the two instead, utilizing some great cabinetry?

 

Kitchen and bath

Bathroom Workbook: 8 Elements of Contemporary Style

Does a sharp, clean and uncluttered bathroom sound good to you? If so, a contemporary design could be the key

kitchen and bath article

 

Mitchell Parker,

Houzz Editorial Staff; writer, musician, father, husband.

Knowing your style isn’t always cut and dried. For example, your home’s current style might not be the one you would have given it if you’d had the choice. Perhaps you purchased things that were practical and fit your budget, instead of as part of a larger design scheme.

So when you’re remodeling a space for the first time and tasked with settling on a vision that reflects your personal taste, it’s not uncommon to wonder, “Just what is my style?”

In this series we’ll look at various bathroom styles to help you narrow your focus.

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Here are eight elements of contemporary style. See if it’s right for youIs your style contemporary, modern, transitional, rustic, industrial? Once something feels and looks right to you, then you can start going through more photos of spaces in that style to help guide you – and your designer – to the bathroom of your dreams.

Here are eight elements of contemporary style. See if it’s right for you

1. Clean lines. Unbroken horizontal lines feature prominently in contemporary bathrooms. Curvy, undulating planes have little relevance here. Cabinet hardware is kept basic as well. Think rectilinear.

2. Authentic materials. “Materials should have authenticity to them,” says architect Lisa Little, who designed this bathroom. “If the material is wood, it should be expressed as wood. If it’s concrete, it’s concrete. So you’re not hiding or altering the materiality; instead you’re celebrating it.”

You won’t find moldings or face frames on cabinets or any other sort of ornamental accents. There are just the essentials here; everything is stripped down to rudimentary forms and materials. Vanities and cabinet doors are single planes and have smooth surfaces. Edges are sharp and clean rather than distressed or beveled. Tile is crisp, and grout is “absolutely flush,” says architect Sally Anne Smith. “Restrain everything.”

“When tile starts to get patterning on the wall or an individual tile becomes ornate or complex, then it’s starting to get away from a cleaner, simpler design,” Little adds.

That goes for countertops, too. “People usually stick to the quartz line so there’s not a lot of movement,” says John Klacka, design director at Lars Remodeling and Design.

3. Lack of clutter. Contemporary spaces have a borderline minimalist aesthetic. That’s why Asian themes work well for them, says designer Michelle Moore, who designed this Asian contemporary bathroom. Both styles follow a stripped-down approach. In contemporary bathrooms, lotions, brushes, appliances etc. all have their own space completely tucked out of the way. “Contemporary style doesn’t really lend itself to someone who has stuff all over the place,” Smith says. “It’s for people who like to put everything away so it looks nice and clean all the time.”

4. Contrast. Instead of ornate details and decor, designers add interest and drama in contemporary spaces with contrast. In this example, smooth concrete mixes with textural bamboo cabinets. There’s also some color contrast going on with white and black. Contemporary spaces tend to stick to colors and hues that are on opposite ends of the spectrum. “It’s more pleasing if you have the wow factor,” Moore says.

5. Simple lighting. Again, basic shapes take precedent over anything showy or ornate.

6. Open space. Even if it’s the illusion of open space, this is a key element. Floating vanities, expansive floors and an overall feeling of lightness and airiness are hallmarks of the style.

7. Colors. While some say contemporary leans toward cooler colors, Little disagrees. “Color is so personal you should not feel as a homeowner that you can’t put any whatever color you prefer,” she says. Instead, it’s more about how the color you choose interacts with the material choices.

Klacka likes going lighter to maintain a fresh, clean feeling. “Diamond white with hints of green, blue or gray is very light and crisp,” he says.

8. Chrome. Polished chrome is found frequently in contemporary fixtures, because it’s sleek. And Little says a lot of the faucet and fixture designs that work so well come out of Europe, where chrome is favored because it is long lasting, is easy to clean and stays true to the material. “If [chrome is] the best thing, then you make it out of that and expose the material. You don’t hide it behind an ornate copper element,” Little says.

Kitchen and Bath

New Southern Style for the Kitchen

by Tamara Holly-Smolyansky

contributor on Houzz.com

 

If southern style conjures images only of lace doilies and floral teacups for you, you’re missing out. Sure, we Southerners are rooted in tradition and those roots run deep, but the new South allows for creative liberties that are sure to suit any style, whether you’re in the mood for dumplings or dim sum. While there are a few ingredients that are essentially Southern, it’s up to you to add your own flavor.

Interior designer Cortney Bishop of Charleston, South Carolina, believes the South is in the midst of a renaissance. “Southern decor has transformed immensely,” she says. “We’re really leading the trend of mixing styles. We’re becoming more and more eclectic.”

Here are a few ways to incorporate the hallmarks of Southern decor into any kitchen.

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Shaker-style cabinets. A staple in many Southern homes, they’re timeless and eternally stylish. “There’s nothing more Southern than a Shaker kitchen,” Bishop says. If you want a different feel, you can update this traditional cabinetry with modern, oversize drawer pulls.

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Patterned walls. “The South has always appreciated wallpaper, and we’ve made it our own,” Bishop says. If you’re feeling apprehensive, add intrigue by papering only an accent area or the inside of a glass cabinet.

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Mason jars. The former “hillbilly wineglass” is now a kitchen mainstay. It’s affordable, available in most grocery stores and incredibly versatile. Use mason jars as candleholders to decorate a kitchen island or on the counter to display baked goods or snacks.

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Taxidermy. The “fauxidermy” trend is riding high, which makes for lots of animal-friendly options. Retailers from Target to Restoration Hardware carry pieces for any budget. “Steer” clear of placing anything with fake fur near cooking areas.

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A quilt as a table cover. Bishop views family heirlooms as an important aspect of Southern style. “They tell the story of history, the story of where we came from,” she says.

A quilt or an afghan in the living room can look dated. Draped across a table, though, it’s unexpected and surprisingly civilized — quintessentially Southern.

 

 

 

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Clapboard. Drive through the historic districts of many Southern towns and you’re bound to see older clapboard homes. I love the idea of a clapboard kitchen wall in an otherwise modern kitchen.

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Random eccentricity. Though some of us may be nuttier than peanut brittle, we still tend to mind our manners, bless our hearts. What the rest of the country calls crazy, we see simply as eccentric. So add an ornate chandelier to your kitchen. No really, we insist.

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Antiques. Take them from the shadows to center stage. Down here we use our grandmother’s dishes, and not just for the holidays. Antique silver vases or trays mix beautifully with new stainless steel elements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nature-inspired hues. “The palette in the South is lighter,” Bishop says, noting that Southerners spend much of their time outside. “And we bring those outdoor colors indoors.”

A grass-green backsplash is a fresh departure from standard-issue gray or white. But even a sky-blue rug or a sunflower-yellow kitchen towel can lighten the look of your room. Accessorizing surfaces with crisp seasonal fruit is the cherry on top.

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American woodwork. “It’s popular and hip now, but we have always appreciated local artisans,” Bishop says of her fellow Southerners. “The new Southern style is younger generations carrying on old traditions of woodworking. Younger Southerners are looking forward, not backward. They’re interested in design as a way to carry on a sense of tradition.”

Kitchen and Bath

Going Up: Vertical Storage Holds More Kitchen Stuff

Almost every kitchen can benefit from vertical storage. You can, of course, plan for vertical storage in a new kitchen, but very often you can also find space in an existing kitchen. It is amazing how much and how many different kinds of storage can be packed into a very tall and narrow or shallow space. So look around; maybe you have an empty wall where you can squeeze in more room for what you need.

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Here is a wall of tall cabinets just packed with storage in a New York loft. The pantry cabinet on the left has swing-out shelves that allow easier access to food than would deep, stationary shelving. The real stars of this vertical storage, however, are the very narrow pullout cabinets, used here for oils and herbs and located right next to the cooktop where they will be used. The mix of cabinet doors creates a pleasing arrangement when closed.

 

 

 

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Spices and oils are natural items for storage in a tall area. Although very shallow, this closet stores a multitude of items. It has been carved from between the studs and finished with a matching cabinet door.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A deeper space accommodates some large apothecary jars, tins and bottles and makes a wonderful display area as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A deeper space accommodates some large apothecary jars, tins and bottles and makes a wonderful display area as well.
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These pots and pans, each hung on their own hook, create an organized display. In addition, this space allows for some shallow shelf storage below.
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Everyone needs a broom closet; here the brooms, mops and cleaning supplies are very efficiently housed in a narrow pullout cabinet. Everything is handy and accessible, much easier to grab than from underneath the sink.
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Just a few inches of space next to a refrigerator have been used to build wine cubbies here. The cubbies match the width of the spacer below that makes sure the refrigerator has enough clearance to open.
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A similar situation: to the right of a window, a slice of space has been appropriated for wine storage. On the left dishware is kept at the ready. These vertical storage units morph into horizontal storage across the tops of the windows here for even more found space.
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Barely more than a wall, this extremely shallow area not only stores platters and plates; it acts as a display wall, too.
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While there was probably ample cabinet space in this kitchen for a bar, a small sliver of space was found on the end wall to showcase the owner’s whiskey collection. The antique decorative grille provides visual interest and highlights the collection. A similar approach could be used to house bright glassware or smaller serving pieces.
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In this narrow galley-style kitchen, there was not enough room for more cabinets. Enter shallow, open, floor-to-ceiling shelves. These create not only extensive storage but a graphic display as well.
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The 15 Most Popular Kitchen Storage Ideas on Houzz

As the home of appliances, cookware and every specialty gadget under the sun, the kitchen is and always will be a perplexing place to organize. The never-ending accessories and endless food cans, boxes and bags easily fill up every nook and cranny, especially in a not-so-big kitchen.

Houzz users have been finding and creating innovative organization techniques to help solve their kitchen dilemmas, from storing pots and pans to organizing a messy walk-in pantry. The favorite solutions below, pulled from our list of most popular photos on Houzz, have been added to tens (and in some cases hundreds) of thousands of users’ ideabooks. See if one of them will inspire an idea for your own kitchen.

Kitchen and Bath1. Custom pantry. More than any other storage solution, Houzzers dream of a perfectly organized walk-in pantry. About 223,000 users have saved this photo to their ideabooks, thanks to its pullout baskets, pocket doors and abundant shelf space.

“People love pantries because they house everything all in one place,” says storage designer Marie Newton, who designed this pantry. “You can see it all, so you don’t end up buying something you already have.”Kitchen and Bath

2. Utensil drawer. This clever utensil built-in keeps serveware and silverware conveniently in check. Added to more than 132,000 ideabooks, this image is one of the most popular on Houzz. If you want the look but can’t afford custom, take the DIY route by placing stainless steel pots in a deep, empty drawer.

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3. Corner drawer. Ingenious corner drawers are a creative solution for awkward corners, which is why 129,000 Houzzers saved this photo. The drawers run diagonally into the corner, which makes them deeper than most and therefore lets them pack a bigger storage punch.
Kitchen and bath4. Cookie sheet drawer. More than 119,000 users agree that this divided drawer is the solution for a range of muffin tins, broiler pans, cooling racks and cookie sheets. If you don’t have a drawer to spare, try a narrow pullout near the stove or add wood ormetal dividers to the cabinet above your refrigerator.
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5. Undersink drawer. The deep cabinet under the sink can seem like a bottomless pit, so it isn’t surprising that 109,000 readers love this easy solution. The drawer keeps cleaning supplies visible. DIY by purchasing and installing your own chrome sliding organizer.
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6. Pullout trash can. More than 108,000 Houzzers love the simplicity of this pullout trash can. It hides unattractive bins and frees up floor space, while the side nook can house trash bags and ties (or an air freshener).
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7. Deep cabinet organizer. This pullout pantry organizer, paired with cabinet door racks, is a favorite for 70,000 users. ”Many of our clients don’t have room for a walk-in pantry,” says Rhoda Fry, CFO at Bill Fry Construction. ”Having storage on the doors and inside keeps everything organized and within easy reach.”
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8. Appliance garage. Just about all of us could use a clutter-free countertop, which is why appliance garages are popular. About 58,000 users like this design, which keeps a blender, toaster and mixer nearby but out of sight.
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9. Rolling cabinet or cart. Acting as both counter and storage, this accessible rolling cart is worth adding. It can work as a kitchen island, especially in a small space, or a bar cart when rolled into any room. About 43,000 users have this in their photo collections on Houzz.
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10. Spice drawer. This handy spice pullout and cabinet rack design has been saved to almost 39,000 ideabooks so far, mostly because it’s so practical.Nathan Cross, president of NWC Construction and contractor of this kitchen, believes that builders should adapt to each individual homeowner instead of creating a one-size-fits-all space. In this instance the client loves to cook, so he ensured that an expansive spice collection was on hand at all times.
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12. Dish drawer. Some 28,000 users love thissturdy, deep drawer, which keeps plates within reach for even the shortest members of the household. This one can hold 75 to 100 pounds, and adjustable pegs let you easily fit in all your breakables.
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11. Open shelves. This look is one of the most popular trends on Houzz, and 28,000 love this kitchen in particular. These stainless steel shelves can display decorative accessories or store daily dishes.
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13. Kitchen mail station. About 19,000 community members long for this kitchen command station, complete with bookshelves, mail slots and a desk. It’s a great way to avoid that midweek paper pileup, and it conveniently lets someone supervise homework time while cooking dinner.
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14. Pullout shelves. Saved to more than 18,000 ideabooks, this pullout shelf provides easy access to pots and pans. This system works great for reaching those back corners in deep cabinets: The front tray pulls out vertically and allows the back tray to slide over to the right.
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15. Pet bowls. Pets are such an important part of many people’s lives, and almost 18,000 Houzzers think these built-in dog bowls are a great kitchen feature. To keep your pet from tripping you up while you cook, you can also add a dog or cat bed to your kitchen.We’d love to know: What storage idea has been a lifesaver in your kitchen?